Archives for category: Veterinary

Reviews are here to stay, and that’s a good thing. But how do businesses defend themselves from those who would abuse the review system for their own ends? In this three-part series, I offer practical advice on how to handle Yelp bombing campaigns and how to mitigate their effects. In part two, we look at how to hopefully prevent, and then handle a weaponized review campaign going viral. You can find part one, on prevention and initial responses, here.

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(image courtesy of http://pexels.com )

Whack-A Mole

After you have responded to the initial review, you now have several reviews all referencing the same issue / incident. The good news is that most review platforms care about their review eco-space and you can report these reviews as violations of their Terms of Service. Brevity is the key. Don’t explain why the reviewer is wrong just explain that the review is essentially a duplicate and part of a campaign or a review by someone who is not a customer.

Make sure to start checking your other platforms for reviews, respond to the first one with your measured response, and then report any duplicates. Don’t forget about other opportunities to post on your social media pages and channels. Yelp Tips, which can only be viewed on mobile devices, are often forgotten. Posts to your Facebook page, or check-ins on Facebook and other location based services, are also areas that need to be monitored. Other than the initial measured response, do not engage on that platform any further. If a customer has a genuine question then of course you should answer, but it ideally should just be a version of your measured response.

Going Viral

Making something go viral, for any reason, is hard. You should take solace in this. As a marketing professional, I have only had one thing go truly viral, and that is not so unusual. An amateur trying to make something go viral will have to be very lucky indeed. However, we do live in an age of ordinary people with extraordinary social reach. If review / story has legs and starts to go viral, you need to be prepared.

Banning people from your Facebook page, and other social media channels, can be counterproductive. In the minds of those posting, it just proves that you have something to hide. Take the moral high ground and post your measured response on your social media channels and your website. This can be a little risky as you are letting your clients and followers know about something you have been trying make go away. It can also be a hard sell to those you report to. It does, however, have the advantage of letting you shape the story rather than letting others shape it and just leaving you to respond.

A great example of this working is how FedEx responded to one of their drivers caught on camera throwing a computer monitor over a fence. By responding publicly, with an apology, and what and how they were going to change, the story went from a FedEx driver throwing a package over a fence as an example of how packages are delivered, to how FedEx’s quick response was indicative of their customer service and culture. I believe one of the genius elements of FedEx’s response was to make a video statement so that their own video could be played alongside the video of their employee throwing the package. This looked a lot better than an uncomfortable interview, or a written statement.

By taking the moral high ground and being open, you may not convince your initial detractors that you are sorry / wanting the resolve the issue, but you may well persuade some that are on the fence about the issue. You will also give ammunition to those in your network, that support you, to help defend you. Your existing loyal customers will often be your biggest defenders and cheerleaders, but they need guidance. For this reason, I am not a big fan of disabling reviews on Facebook pages and the ability of users to post – but that is decision that needs to be based on the individual situation.

The Press

News organizations, and particularly local TV news, get pitched multiple times every day by people angry by how they feel they have been treated by a business. The good news for businesses is that it takes a lot for a story to be picked up, and anyone who is waging a campaign against you is unlikely to get past their screening process. The bad news is that news organizations need human interest stories, and if the customer is credible, and has a story with legs, then the media may get involved.

It is important that whomever answers the phones in your company, and your entire frontline staff for that matter, understand how to deal with the press when they come calling. “I know that the management will want to talk with you and address the situation. I am not the right person for you to talk with, but let me get you someone who is.” is an example of how to correctly respond to an enquiry. “No comment” is about the worst thing that anyone can say to press. The lack of a comment becomes the story. It makes it look like whomever has said it has something to hide because they don’t want to speak.

When talking to the press be very brief. The longer the answer you give, the more chance there is for something to be taken out of context. If you do not speak to the press; however, you will not make the story go away. Reporters have deadlines, so be cognizant and respectful of that. For the most part reporters are not looking to burn anyone, but they do want a story – try to make it yours, and not defined by someone else.

Unfortunately, once the media gets involved with viral story, it can self-perpetuate a Yelp bombing campaign with others who have read about / or seen the story leaving reviews. Again, Yelp itself is pretty good about dealing with this. If you send a link to the story in the media story when flagging the review Yelp can suspend all reviews to your account until interest burns out.

If you have stories, or additional tips on how to solve Yelp Bombing / review campaigns, please let me know in the comments. If you have an ongoing issue, please feel free to reach out to me.

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One of the things that is interesting about the veterinary profession is how wrong a lot of the “experts” can often be. The people who were bemoaning that there were ‘too many vet schools pushing out too many graduates for too few jobs’ a few years back are the same people who are now complaining of how hard it is to hire an associate veterinarian! Dr. Dave Nicol does not belong in this camp at all. Not only is he willing to talk the talk, but he is also willing to walk the walk, with a career that includes managing and owning large and small practices on multiple continents.

Dr. Nicol’s latest book, you can read my review of his first book “The Yellow Pages are Dead” here, is timely and astute. While the need, and competition, for new graduates has never been greater, it seems that as a profession we seem to be failing them in multiple ways. “So You’re A Vet…Now What?” aims to fill the gap that is not being filled by most employers and is certainly not being filled by the veterinary schools. Chapters range from how to not get sued to “your health and wellness,” handling the emotional toll of euthanasia, and how a new graduate should choose a first job.

As well as focusing on the major issues facing new graduates, “So You’re A Vet…Now What?” also tackles the more complicated subject of company culture and the new graduates place in fostering great leadership, in themselves and others. The book aims not only to foster great new graduates, but help turn them in to excellent veterinarians that clients will want to see, employers will want to employ, and staff will want to work with.

Dr. Nicol’s friendly, and conversational tone makes “So You’re A Vet…Now What?” an easy and short read, I finished the book in a single sitting that lasted a little over three hours; however, it is also a book that new graduates will want to refer back to. With some great stories, I want to know what happened to the vet through the glass – see chapter five, and real-world examples, this book is literally the new vet’s handbook.

For employers, there are some controversial topics, and I find a couple of the ‘lines in the sand’ a little too ridged. Additionally, since Dr. Nicol hails from the UK and currently practices there, it is little U.K. centric which American readers may find a little jarring; however, these are all very minor quibbles / observations on an excellent and important book not just for new graduates but for employers of new graduates and the larger profession beyond.

The book is available as a digital download from http://www.drdavenicol.com and a printed version is forthcoming.

Reviews are here to stay, and that’s a good thing. But how do businesses defend themselves from those who would abuse the review system for their own ends? In this three-part series, I offer practical advice on how to handle Yelp bombing campaigns and how to mitigate their effects. In part one, we look at how to prevent, and initially respond, to weaponized reviews.

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(image courtesy of http://pexels.com )

Nobody in business likes getting bad reviews. Anyone who pours their heart and soul into an enterprise can feel dispirited, and treated unfairly, when receiving criticism; particularly when you have not been given the chance to try and resolve the issue.

Like it or not, reviews are here to stay. They are a fact of doing business today. To deal with everyday review issues, I highly recommend Jay Baer’s excellent “Hug Your Haters,” which I reviewed here.

Unfortunately, however, there are people who try to turn reviews into a weapon. This is usually achieved by posting multiple reviews, sometimes across multiple platforms, using multiple different accounts, giving the impression of a serious issue or to destroy the businesses review platform rating. This can be to extort money and / or services, or as an act of revenge. This kind of review warfare is also sometimes known by the term “Yelp bombing.” This series, hopefully, will give you some grounding, and tools, to help protect yourself, and your business, from weaponized reviews.

It is important to recognize the difference between a Yelp bombing campaign and a review going viral. If something is going viral, it is because strangers like, or are outraged by, what they see or read. When it comes to a concerted attack, there may be a hope that the attack will become viral, but it is originally perpetrated one person, or a small group, trying to exert influence. This could be a customer, a former employee, a competitor, or just a bully trying to change something about you or your business.

Prevention

It is a cliché, but an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Have a complaints procedure for your clients. Empower your staff to solve small issues before they turn into big issues. Listen, learn, and respond to your reviews. Try to divorce yourself from the idea that you are right and they are wrong. It does not matter if you win the argument in your place of business. If you turn your customer into an enemy, and they then bash you online, you have lost.

Usually, apologies cost nothing. Make them sincere and swallow your pride. If the dispute cannot be resolved with an apology ask a simple question: “how much am I willing to pay to not have this appear on Yelp or other review sites?” Whatever the answer is, there is your budget for resolving this complaint.

Obviously, you have to have claimed your business on all the major review platforms. Going through this in detail is really outside the realm of this article; however, you should receive an email, or alert, anytime someone posts a review on Yelp, Google, or Facebook. I would also strongly suggest that you have a Google Alert running for mentions of your business name, names of key personal, or anything else that someone may use to identify or describe your business. You can setup alerts here: https://www.google.com/alerts

Stay away from controversial subjects with your online presence. Businesses should standup and be counted for causes and ideas they support, but go into it with your eyes open. With any controversial subject, there is the potential for someone to become upset and try to change your stance by methods other than debate or no longer giving you their custom.

Assessment

Despite your best efforts; however, you find yourself a target of a Yelp bombing campaign. It is important to note, that while the term “Yelp bombing” has become a generic term for an online review attack, Yelp is actually the platform you want this kind of attack to take place on. Yelp tends to have the best tools and resources for a business to protect itself. I am not a big fan of Yelp, you can read my feelings about Yelp and why I dislike their business model here, but when it comes to Yelp bombing they really do have their act together.

The first signs of a campaign against your business will usually be you being alerted to, or reading, a 1-star review. Speed is of the essence. If the review is seemingly out of nowhere, then reach out to the reviewer apologizing for their experience and asking if you can help to resolve the situation. If the platform allows it, message the reviewer privately. Don’t be afraid to ask them for their name so you can look into the matter.
If, despite your speedy response, more reviews are posted, then you have genuine situation on your hands.

First, breathe.

It is easy to feel panicked and that events are completely out of your control. You need to be the one with the cool head. People undertaking a Yelp bombing campaign are not doing so from a particularly rational place. This usually shows up in the writing and the nature of the complaint.

Read the review(s). Does the client have a point from reading the review? Is it a good story? If you were not connected to the business would you want to learn more? Remember right and wrong does not enter into your assessment of the campaign. What you need to assess is whether the story has “legs.” Is what has been written true? If someone reads this who knows nothing about your business will they believe it? Get other people’s opinions – this will help bring some perspective. If you make the assessment that the reviewer has a point and that the story has legs then there is the potential for it go viral, which is what you are trying to stop.

First Responses

Do not, I repeat, do not be in too much of a hurry to tell your side of the story. However, while it is important to not to lash out immediately with why your customer is “wrong, crazy, or clueless,” it is also important that your response is prompt and the correct response.

If the reviewer is not communicating, then start to craft a public response that addresses your position in very general terms and that you are happy to engage further via a different channel. I am a big proponent for email as this new channel. Email keeps the communication out of the public eye, unless someone posts it, it takes the heat out of conversations, and it gives you a written record. I know others feel that responding by a phone call, or even meeting in person, are better solutions. I would suggest that you choose whatever you are the most comfortable with.

Your response should be read by multiple other people and you should all agree that it is reasonable, conciliatory, and addresses the reviewer’s primary complaint. If the campaign against you has legs, and starts to go viral, your response will also be featured so it is important that the response is the right one.

It should also go without saying, that you should never retaliate. You need to be the adult, and it needs to be clearly seen by any 3rd party that you are conciliatory, level headed, and just trying to resolve the issue.

If you have stories, or additional tips on how to solve Yelp bombing / review campaigns, please let me know in the comments. If you have an ongoing issue, please feel free to reach out to me.

I’ve been holding staff meetings in veterinary hospitals for 10 years.

That is a lot of monthly staff meetings.

It occurred to me perhaps others could use some of this information for their own meetings in the same way that I used this information from where ever I stole it from.

I’m envisioning this being an ongoing resource for those who have to come up with topics for discussion or team building.

You can find Part One on Customer Service here and you can find Part Two on Team Building Activities here.

I have removed a lot of the hospital specific information and so please feel free to add, rearrange, and generally change the information to suit your practice, or business.  I’m going to try and keep similar subjects together. This week we are looking at communication tools. There are a lot of pictures here which are either royalty free (from Pexels.com) or I have created so you are welcome to use all of them.  If you do end up using some of this I’d love to see your slide decks, pictures, or presentations.

ABCDE

We do a stressful job.

We, hopefully, try to keep the drama to a minimum.

We don’t always succeed.

When dealing with other people it often makes sense to question ourselves to help resolve an issue. If we intellectualize our emotional interactions it can help change behavior, and explain the connections between our actions and their consequences.

This system is based on Albert Ellis Cognitive Behavioral Therapy model, but it can be adapted to everyday interactions and is particularly useful for those who have a habit of repeating the same behaviors again and again.

ABC

A = An Activating Event. Something happens. It could be something another person says. It could be something that happens that to you:

  • It could be your spilt coffee,
  • or someone ran their car into the back of yours,
  • or your boss told you off for something that was not your fault.

These are all “Activating Events.” Things that are not in your control.

B = Beliefs about those events. When something happens to you, you have a belief about that event:

  • “I’m so clumsy and stupid I’m always spilling things,”
  • “That person who ran into the back of me can’t drive, or certainly should not be allowed to,”
  • “My boss is a jerk, I’ll show him, let’s see how he likes it when I go slow, and don’t talk to him unless I have to.”

C = Consequences of those beliefs. Having those beliefs leads to consequences:

  • A spilt coffee leads to questioning your ability to do anything, this makes you nervous when handling physical tasks, which in turn makes it more likely that you will spill or drop things.
  • You leap out of your car and immediately berate the person whose car just ran into yours, making sure that the person understands just how angry you are and how it is all their fault and that they can’t drive and should have their license taken away.
  • Your boss becomes exasperated with you as the quality, and particularly the speed, of your work deteriorates.

Consequences lead to more activating events that become self-perpetuating:

  • You stop doing any physical task with breakables or liquids.
  • When the police arrive you are placed in handcuffs for being disruptive and out of control.
  • You receive a written warning for insubordination, not being a team player, and having a bad attitude.

And in turn you have similar beliefs out these “Activating Events:”

  • “I’m so stupid and clumsy I can’t do anything, nobody trusts me and nobody should.”
  • “That guy and his crazy driving got me arrested, I’m going to get him.”
  • “What jerk my boss is, I’ll show him, I’m calling in sick tomorrow because I know they will be really shorthanded without me.”

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Activating events and the beliefs we have about those events lead to consequences, which in turn lead to more activating events which we have beliefs about which lead to more consequences.

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So how do we break this cycle?

It is important to understand that our beliefs about activating events are all in our head. They are what we think about the activating event, but they are not necessarily correct. Those beliefs that lead to consequences are really not connected to those activating events. We make those connections.

So when an activating event happens, we need to “D”ispute the belief we have about it if those beliefs lead to bad consequences, or consequences that get in the way of our happiness, career and general well-being.

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By disputing those beliefs we gain new “E”xperiences. This in turn will lead to positive activating events which can re-enforce our new beliefs.

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Our beliefs about activating events are a prism through which we see the world. We choose how to experience things. It is helpful to imagine a wall between activating events and beliefs. And it is our beliefs that act as a filter which leads to the consequences we want. We are responsible for our own experiences, and if we want to change those experiences we need to look at our beliefs about activating events.

[It is useful at this point to play out scenarios that staff members may have experienced, or that you all have experienced, and see how they fit into this model.]

 

Making your Job Easier – First impressions.

[This is very much a discussion based item. I am giving my opinions and how I would use them in this exercise. You may have different opinions and so may your staff. The point is to get people to understand that first impressions matter and that although it may not be right to base a relationship on first impressions, people do it all the time because of a lack of there data. If we can think about appearance and how others will interpret it we can at least have a discussion about presentation issues.]

First impressions matter.

They matter because you make decisions about other people and other people make decisions about you.  Now we can control whether we act on those decisions to a certain extent, but we have no control over how others view and act on their first impressions.

I believe that the better a first impression you can make the easier your job becomes. Your first impression is a tool that you can use before any other and it takes minimal effort.

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Who is this man? What are our first impressions of him? Is he at home? In his office? What kind of job does he do? How professional is he? Would we be happy going up and talking to him? What would we think if he talked to us?

What I take away from this picture:

  • Professional in a casual field (shirt, neat hair, type of laptop.)
  • Working away from his office (cell phone visible, laptop, and no cables to either).
  • Concentrating and busy, but seems approachable.

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Who is this man? What are our first impressions of him? How does he compare to the previous photo?

What I take away from this picture:

  • Stressed!
  • Could also work in a casual field but difficult to tell if he is working or not (dress, stickers on laptop – note it’s the same laptop.)
  • Obviously in a coffee shop, but laptop is plugged in which seems to suggest given his demeanor that he does not want to be there as he has had to charge his computer.
  • Unapproachable.

These two individuals could be dealing with the same issue, in fact they could be communicating with each other. But from first impressions they are very different while essentially doing the same things and they could even be from the same company in very similar circumstances.

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What do we take away from this picture?

  • Businessman.
  • A successful professional (polished appearance and comfortable).
  • At a conference (lanyard around his neck)
  • Representing something (a company or organization pin on his jacket)
  • Listening and interested in what he is hearing, but not afraid of it.

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What do we take away from this picture?

  • Business man.
  • Does not look as successful (unpolished appearance – shirt is neat but almost looks like it does not belong given the ill fitting sleeves. Unshaven.)
  • Looks nervous – not enjoying the conversation.

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What do we take away from this picture?

  • Professional but casual.
  • Clean polo shirt, very neat.
  • Dentist (equipment in background)?

How does this picture compare to the last two? Is this how this dentist might look when coming into the office on his day off? Even so, do we trust him?

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What do we take away from this picture?

  • Confidence
  • High self-opinion
  • Not very subtle
  • All about the impression – very loud and in your face.
  • Are you impressed?

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What do we take away from this picture?

  • Doesn’t care what we think.
  • Some effort has been put into his appearance but on his terms (hair is neat, but unshaven, and an un-ironed shirt.)
  • Cigarette is a statement.
  • Are we impressed?
  • A tragic figure?

How we present ourselves to others has an impact. If all a client has to go on is a few short words with us then the non-verbal cues such as our demeanor and our dress are just as important if not more so in building trust.

I’ve been holding staff meetings in veterinary hospitals for 10 years.

That is a lot of monthly staff meetings.

It occurred to me perhaps others could use some of this information for their own meetings in the same way that I used this information from where ever I stole it from.

I’m envisioning this being an ongoing resource for those who have to come up with topics for discussion or team building.

You can find Part One on Customer Service here and Part Three on Communication Tools here.

I have removed a lot of the hospital specific information and so please feel free to add, rearrange, and generally change the information to suit your practice, or business.  I’m going to try and keep similar subjects together. This week we are looking at team building exercises and games. If you end up using some of this I’d love to see your slide decks, pictures, or presentations.

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Blind Trust

Separate into pairs. One of the pair is blind folded and needs to be navigated to the other side of a room full of obstacles.

The obstacles can be anything. I’ve printed out pictures of lava, snakes, poo, etc. and then taped additional sheets of paper to the pictures to make the “obstacles” interesting shapes. If you have difficulty finding blind folds elasticated headbands work really well.

Have both members of each pair stand at the same end of the room. Have one of each pair put the blind fold on. Quickly rearrange the obstacles so that the blindfolded team member done not have the benefit of having seen the layout of the course. The un-blindfolded team member instructs the blindfolded team member through the “maze” while they remain at the starting point. Then the roles are reversed. If a blindfolded team member steps on an obstacle they go back the start and they try again. If you have candy or some other kind of reward it helps get the competitive juices flowing.

This is a fun exercise that teaches the value of listening to instructions and working as a team. It does eat up a lot of time so don’t cram it into a busy meeting, particularly if you have a lot of people.

What’s That Tune?

Have a deck of index cards with the names of very recognizable tunes written on them. Split your group into two halves. Give a card to victim / volunteer and have them share the name of the tune with the rest of their group. Have the volunteer tap out the tune and see if the other group can guess that the tune is. You can then have the groups reverse their roles a couple of times. Have anyone who thinks they know the tune out their hand up rather than shout out.

The group who know what the tune is will find that it is almost impossible to believe that the other group does not recognize the tune from what is being tapped out. But then they will realize how difficult it is when it is their turn to guess.

This exercise is used to explain “the curse of knowledge.” Context and knowledge are incredibly important for communication, but they can hinder. When a person has knowledge (such as the name of a song) it can sometimes be difficult for them to understand why someone who does not have the knowledge can’t understand a less than ideal description of that knowledge. Things that are obvious to staff that deal with the subject everyday are not so obvious to clients who do not.

Song Suggestions:

Star Spangled Banner

Star Wars Theme

Jingle belles

Game of Thrones Theme

Twinkle Twinkle Little Star

Tower Building

Get whatever materials you have to hand. Straws, paper cups, paper plates, sticky tape, etc. Spilt your group into separate teams and see which team can build the highest free standing tower within five minutes.

This is a great ice breaker and team building exercise that is cheap and does not take a lot of time.

Call My Bluff

Works better with smaller groups of less experienced staff. Have everyone sit in a circle and have a small table with a selection of brochures for the products / services you sell. Use a stuffed toy or something similar to designate who’s turn it is to speak.

Pick a person to start who chooses a leaflet from the table. They read out three statements relating the product leaflet, one of them should be false. If someone in the circle guesses which statement is false they get to pick who gets the stuffed animal and picks a leaflet next. If someone in the circle incorrectly identifies a true answer as false they get the stuffed animal and have to pick a leaflet.

This exercise not only allows staff to learn about the products and services you sell it also helps pinpoint deficiencies in training programs.

The Prisoners’ Dilemma

Two players.

Each player should have no more than 25 coins. Tell both players that they can keep all the coins that they have at the end of 20 rounds as long as they play all 20 rounds.  However, warn them that you may play multiple games using the coins they have and they cannot reuse coins that they bet or win. Players can talk to each other but they need to hide their bet until both bets are revealed at the same time (behind or underneath a player’s hand is usually the easiest way to achieve this.)

Each player chooses whether to bet one, two, or three coins.  The player that bets the highest number of coins wins. If players bet the same they each get to keep the coins and they have survived another round.

A player that consistently bets three or two coins will run out of coins and therefore will not be able to complete all twenty rounds and will lose all their coins. A player that consistently bets one coin risks losing coins to the other player.

Ideally what should happen is that both players come to the realization that if they just agree to always bet one coin at the end of the 20 rounds they will both be 20 coins richer. However, there can be a temptation for one of the players to bet more at or near to the end. If this happens, then it is interesting to play another game with the same two players, or with a fresh player and the player who did not co-operate, and see how the cooperation goes this time.

The obvious goal it to show how working for the good of the group is actually in the interest of the individual as well. And while making a short-term gain can sometimes seem worth it in the long run everyone loses.

 

I’ve been holding staff meetings in veterinary hospitals for 10 years.

That is a lot of monthly staff meetings.

It occurred to me perhaps others could use some of this information for their own meetings in the same way that I used this information from where ever I stole it from.

You can find Part Two on Team Building Exercises and Games here, and Part Three on Communication Tools here.

I’m envisioning this being an ongoing resource for those who have to come up with topics for discussion or team building. I have removed a lot of the hospital specific information and so please feel free to add, rearrange, and generally change the information to suit your practice, or business.  I’m going to try and keep similar subjects together. This week we are looking at customer service. If you end up using some of this I’d love to see your slide decks or presentations.

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The Client Centered Practice

Why should we care about clients?

We are here for the pets…

To help pets we have to invest in happy clients.

We are here to cater to Clients Our job is to make our clients experience exceptional and therefore to return.

1st impressions are formed in 7 secs. Be Likable: attitude, smile, eye contact, raise eyebrows, shake hands, lean in but stay 2′ away.

Ask clients why they named their pet what they named them. Open ended questions help boost engagement.

Be complimentary, thank clients for trusting you / us with their pet.

Any time you surprise clients you build customer loyalty. If you do something nice for them they will do something nice for us.

Tell clients stories about their pet. Make sure clients know what you do to make pets comfortable.

Upset clients are a chance for us to shine: “What I will do is…” “We appreciate your feedback…” “Let me see what I can do about that.”

Use the pets name in the conversation. Do not refer to he, she, or it. If you must refer to the sex… GET IT RIGHT!

Internal Customer Service

How we interact with each other is at least as important as how we interact with clients.

Every time we do not deliver excellent customer service to a co-worker there is a client, or patient, at the other end who is not getting good customer service.

Always try to view things from our client’s perspective.

A client’s reality is not ours.

Our clients should never suffer because internal issues.

Phone Based Customer Service

Every client who calls wants to come in.

Every client will call other places if we let them.

It is difficult for owners to evaluate the quality of veterinary services. They can’t use logic to evaluate services they only know how we make them feel.

55% of communication is visual.

7% of communication is content.

38% is how things are said.

On the phone we are already handicapped because of the lack of visual.

How we say things is doubly important.

The ROI of awesome customer service (15:00 minute mark to 20:25 minute mark)

 

Setting Customer Expectations

We don’t know what our clients are expecting.

Some vet hospitals do things differently than others.

Clients get upset because we do not do what they thought we should do.

A customer has a certain expectation of customer service when they visit Wal-Mart or a McDonalds.

A customer has a different expectation of the level of customer service when they visit Nordstrom or Starbucks.

A customer who goes to Nordstrom and get’s a Wal-Mart level of service…

(Give examples of online reviews and client expectation mismatch)

Zappos charge for shipping, and clients expect to be charged for shipping.

However, occasionally giving away free shipping to a client makes the client feel valued and grateful.

If we let client’s know what is going to happen and then we exceed those expectations they will love us for it.

(Clicking on the image above will take you to Amazon where a tiny percentage goes to help fund my book buying habit.)

“We have always had some influence over the justice system but for the first time in 180 years, since the stocks and the pillory were outlawed we have the power to determine the severity of some punishments and so we have to think about what level of mercilessness we feel comfortable with.”

So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson shines a, sometimes unwelcome, light on the unforgiving nature of Internet shaming. Ronson convincingly argues that almost 200 years ago we abandoned shaming as a form of punishment, not due a lack of effectiveness with rise of the larger towns and cities, but because it was seen as overly cruel.

Ronson has extraordinary access to those who lives have been ruined because of a bad out of context joke, calling out someone for perceived sexist comments, for making perceived sexist comments, and for being too irreverent in a selfie at a national memorial. The author also cleverly focuses on those less worthy of pity; the successful author who gets found out for making up quotes, and exposes our own attitudes to shaming. And then there are those who seem to have beaten the shame cycle; the UK publicist who went to war with the tabloid press, and the small town where almost a hundred of its citizenry where reveled to be visiting a local prostitute.

As well as telling the story of the various victims of the modern age of public shaming, Ronson also tells us of his own journey and grappling with his own role in the shaming of others and of being of control of his internet persona. This does not hang together quite as well as the rest of the book. I have a hard time, for instance, that such a talented researcher cannot look back through their own Twitter history to see who they have previously shamed. However, this is minor quibble and a brave personal exploration and opening up about personal shame.

The book does end on a relatively positive note due to the miracles of Search Engine Optimization (SEO), however the real point of the book is for the reader to examine how they feel about this return of public shaming. Even for those whom it is hard to defend; the hunters seeking big game trophies, the Vet taking pleasure in shooting a cat with a bow and arrow, and the plagiarizing author, to name but a few – do they really deserve this level of life altering destruction?

For those who answer yes, this book is for you. “So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed” is, if nothing else, a testament to how much of a double edged sword internet shame can be, how cruel and destructive it is, and how uncomfortable we should all be with it. The Internet shows us at our best and worst as a culture – it is we who have to change.

Note: I have refrained from using the names of any of the subjects, or related people, in this post so as not to add to add to the problem.

By Mike Falconer

In the very short history of live streaming with mobile devices through apps such as Periscope, and perhaps more importantly Facebook due to its ubiquity, there have been number of notable firsts. Some have been amazing, some have been funny, and lots have been horrific.

The shooting death during a traffic stop of Philando Castile by a Police Officer, quite apart from being an awful tragedy which is still under investigation, had its immediate aftermath streamed live over Facebook as you have undoubtably heard if not indeed actually seen.

The debate, the police response, and I am sure the entire investigation, surrounding this shooting has been framed by one of the witnessing participants and their actions. Not that fact that a video exists but that a video exists and a significant portion of the population of the country, if not the world, will have seen and even taken part in the immediate aftermath.

There may actually be a lot of good that comes from the instant live streaming of events, even when bad things happen; however, we live in a pretty unforgiving world. And so it was the Philando Castile shooting that started me thinking about the wider implications not just for race relations and policing, but for how people will deal with difficult, or even impossible situations, and how that will impact those on the other end of those situations.

Social media, and its close cousin the online review, has created a culture that embraces the shaming of mistakes and, for the most part, rejects the idea of context. All to often these tools are used as instruments of revenge rather than as a tool to achieve resolution or inform other consumers. We don’t put people in stocks in the town square any more, but we do ruin their lives for a bad joke in ill taste or a photograph that seems to mock our most cherished beliefs. As Jon Ronson writes in his excellent – So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed – “We have always had some influence over the justice system but for the first time in 180 years, since the stocks and the pillory were outlawed we have the power to determine the severity of some punishments and so we have to think about what level of mercilessness we feel comfortable with.”

In business, we may yet yearn for the days when an unhappy client meant a vitriolic Yelp post at 2AM. All businesses prefer, or at least they should, clients to complain when they are unhappy for whatever reason. A complaint from a client is an opportunity to salvage a situation and gain a more loyal client at the end of it. However, when the complaint itself becomes an instrument of revenge and shaming how should, or indeed how can, businesses respond?

The nightmare scenario could take many forms, however in the veterinary world it could take the form of difficult conversation about quality of life, cost of treatment, and accusations of medical error live streaming across the Internet, with the client’s social circle providing encouragement and additional fuel to the fire. Add to that nightmare scenario that most people are nervous when on camera and that as a business you have little chance to respond due to social circles being closed and content being shared far and wide. Imagine your worst experience in an exam room and then add 10s, 100s, maybe even 1,000s of additional participants not as a moment on what happened, but actively participating.

In this situation, it will not be about customer service and it will not be about a complaint. It will be about damage control. This will be about the power of one person to control their environment, and those around them, by leveraging their social circle and social reach. This will no longer be a conversation with a client, it will become responding to a leader of an angry mob.

With power comes great responsibility, but also the potential for great irresponsibility.

As people who deal with the public at stressful times we all need to be comfortable with the fact that live streaming is here and what it could mean for all interactions. The time to be thinking about this is not as the person across from you says “by the way I’m streaming this on Facebook.”

I do not have great insights into how to deal with these situations other than the same insights as to how to deal with online reviews. Deal with them the same way as if the camera was not there. Easier said than done I know. Try and address your clients concerns, be accommodating, and try and deliver excellent customer service. Be the reasonable one – be the professional. It may mean that we all need to be comfortable on camera – how we sound, how we talk, and what to say and not to say.

Live streaming has huge potential and has already affected the world and how we view events. However, it’s greatest impact may be at the personal level and end, or a new appreciation for, personal privacy. Banning technology rarely works. Adapting and being prepared, however, is far better option that sticking ones head in the sand. Facebook will still see the rest of you if you do anyway.

A Very Fictional Exchange

By Mike Falconer

Dr. Try Ingtodomybest: Good afternoon Ms. Dis Satisfied what seems to be the problem?

Ms. Dis Satisfied: Problem? I’ll tell you what the problem is. I’ve been waiting to see you for 45 minutes and then when I do see you it is only for 10 minutes!

Dr. T: I’m sorry, we’ve been rather busy today and we we have had other cases that have taken longer than we would have liked – I’m so sorry for the delay.

Ms. D: You are just too busy, you don’t allow enough time for each appointment. You just try to pack us all in so you can charge as much as you can per hour. Oh and by the way you charge too much – been here 10 minutes and you want to charge me almost $200!

Dr. T: To be perfectly honest there is a certain amount of truth in what you say. We have to schedule based on the best use of our time with the most optimistic length of each visit. If we didn’t, your visit would be even more expensive.

Ms. D: Nonsense. My 10 minute visit should cost the same regardless of what else is going on in this hospital. I am only using 10 minutes of your and the staff’s time.

Dr. T: If only that were the case. You see you also pay for the down time; well actually to be more precise all clients do, just like you all pay for the overhead of the building.

Ms. D: Why should I pay for you doing nothing?

Dr. T: Believe me I don’t want you to, I want you to only pay for the time that you use, but in order for that to happen we need to keep as busy as possible. The busier we are the more efficient use of our labor which is 50% of our cost of your visit.

Ms. D: So what you are telling me is that your time is more valuable than mine?

Dr. T: Only in as much as you value it in that way. In order to make care for your pet accessible there is a balance to be struck between the average waiting time / length of appointment and the cost of that appointment. Let me put it this way, Would you be willing to pay more to guarentee less of a wait time and a longer, on average appointment?

Ms. D: That would be depend on the value of the appointment?

Dr. T: I am assuming that is value as you see it as opposed to how I see it?

Ms. D: Surely they are the same thing?

Dr. T: The value of a heartworm test to me is, other than it being good medicine and the best thing for your pet of course, is what you pay for it and the potential for finding other conditions. If we catch a condition early we can then treat with the better chance of a good outcome because we caught them early. The value for you of a heartworm test is piece of mind and it allows you to receive heartworm preventive which is what is the best thing for the health of your pet. Those points of view both have value, but if our view of value is too out of sync then you won’t get the heartworm test for your dog, neither of us has piece of mind and although your visit will be shorter and I can see another patient more quickly, I will not receive the fee for the test or the medication.

Ms. D: So what you are telling me is that if I want to have a longer appointment with you and less waiting time I would have to pay more?

Dr. T: Well of course. The basic rule of veterinary medicine as things currently stand is the whatever walks through the doors pays the bills. If not enough walks through the doors one of three things happens. We raise our prices, we lower our costs (wages are 50% of our costs remember), or we close.

Ms. D: You could always get more people to come through your doors?

Dr. T: Absolutely, but these are the other side of the coin of raising prices and lowering costs. Getting people through the door when they are not already coming in means lowering prices or raising costs – in other words marketing. If successful it solves the problem if it fails it, course just makes the problem worse.
Ms. D: But this just sounds like all you care about is the money?

Dr. T: The flip side of that is that all you care about is the money! Everyone in the building spends their days with pets and most have made it their career and for less money than they could get in other professions.

Ms. D: I’m tired of that argument – there is value in spending your day with pets most people would love a job like that.

Dr. T: Touche! However the reality does not always live up to the public perception. Hence the high burn out rate and other serious ills of the profession. I’ll give your visit today for free if you can name a television portrayal which matches what actually happens inside a real hospital.

Ms. D: ……

Dr. T: Do you like flying?

Ms. D: No I hate it, packed in like sardines, air travel used to be so stylish.

Dr. T: Why don’t you fly business class or first class?

Ms. D: Because I am not made of money – I come here too often.

Dr. T: A business class seat costs anywhere from 2 – 4 times the price of an economy priced seat because it uses the 2 – 4 times the resources of an economy seat. The most precious of which is, of course, space. Your hankering for the good old days of air travel was when all seats were business class. Lowering the barriers to air travel has meant we can now travel like never before; however, it also means that we do not value it in the same way.

Ms. D: So if I am understanding you correctly, you are telling me that as a Doctor you have to bring in a certain amount of money every hour like a quota. How can I trust you if you are doing this?

Dr. T: That is one way of looking at it. I would rather look at it as I have to carry my share of costs of having a facility like this so it can be open. As long as we charge appropriately the unwritten contract that we have where we charge based on our costs and in return we will make every effort to be cognizant of not taking you for granted and at the same time not letting you take us for granted, will mean that conversations like this will never have to happen in the real world.

Ms. D: Well thank you for your time and for your insights – can I get a payment plan for todays visit please?

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